2 Haikus: Crow

Hey beautiful people! ❤

I’ve recently been engrossed in the literary work of English poet Ted Hughes. He wrote a collection of poems called Crow: From The Life and Songs of the Crow, and this inspired the Haikus written below.

 

Crows caw, piercing shriek

Flocks of black darken the sky

Congregation roosts

 

Foraging in groups

Dark shadows under branches

Mask wild toothless grins

 

 

Photo by freestocks.org from Pexels https://www.pexels.com/photo/animal-avian-beak-birds-203088/

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46 thoughts on “2 Haikus: Crow

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  1. Nice! I love crows and the ways they’re represented in literature. I’ll have to check Hughes out. Meanwhile, since we’re talking poets, if you haven’t already done so, treat yourself to some Billy Collins, former U.S. Poet Laureate. He’s my all-time favorite contemporary poet and radically changed my poetic style.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. You should! Hughes is one of the greatest literary poets. Or was, he died in 98. Little fact here, he was married to Sylvia Plath and her suicide inspired some of the material in the book. Themes of brutality and the dark energy of death that resides in all life. Not the most merriest of concepts lol but I can appreciate intense literature for what it is.
      I will check out Collins, and then see If I can spot the inspiration in your work. Thanks for your comment ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Just remembered this: one of my favorite American novelist/poets, Stephen Dobyns, has a nice little poem-within-a-poem about crows in “Six Poems on Moving” first published in _Griffon_ and collected in _Velocities: New & Selected Poems_, which is permanently perched on my nightstand.

    Liked by 1 person

      1. Yes when you realize what happened next after he painted that, the imagery becomes quite terrifying.

        Especially since in many mythologies in the world, crows were seen as harbingers of death.

        In poor Vincent’s case, it turned out to be true.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Yes, and that’s why multiple crows together are called ‘a murder’. Such a strange way to name a group of animals! An example of their dark, haunting reputation.
        Van Gogh was incredibly troubled, and I think he depicted the sense of loniless and solitude he felt prior to his dead, with artistic dignity.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Yes, I think that’s very very true.

        I like that phrase “he depicted the sense of loneliness and solitude he felt prior to his death with artistic dignity”.

        Because that’s exactly what he did.

        Just as he painted everything and everyone with artistic dignity- the poor, the working classes, sunflowers and daffodils, starry starry nights, Parisienne street cafes and the prostitutes who walked the evening streets of Paris.

        All he captured with a sense of artistic dignity.

        Being able to see the transcendent in people and things that the world considered mundane or of not much intrinsic value.

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Ugh your comment ☺let’s both work on an essay about this it would be so vibrant 😊
        But seriously you’re absolutely right. I wish their were more people like him. The world’s ‘trash’ was his treasure and he etched his love for the downtrodden with a poignancy I’ve not seen anywhere else.

        Liked by 1 person

  3. Crows are associated with sinister ideas like death in many cultures. In our part of India, there is a belief that dead ancestors visit you, on a particular day, in the form of crows. On that day, we feed crows with cooked rice. It is weird but many people do take it seriously. Human imagination has given crows a mysterious reputation. Maybe because they have wild toothless grins.

    Liked by 1 person

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